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Heiwadai Park Peace Tower

Heiwadai Park 平和台公園 Peace Park A 36-metre (118 ft) tower was constructed in 1940 to memorialize the installment of Japan's first emperor, Jimmu.[3] The original name was Hakkō ichiu Tower, meaning "Eight World Regions Under One Roof," a slogan of the Imperial Japanese Army.[2] Designed by Jitsuzo Hinago, the tower was created from stones gathered from around the then-current extent of the Japanese empire at a cost of 670,000 yen.[3][1] The writing "Hakkō ichiu" was removed after the Japanese defeat at the insistence of the U.S. military.[3] The tower was the inception point for the torch relay of the 1964 Summer Olympics.[3] Subsequent to the Olympics, which coincided with worldwide interest in the Japanese Imperial family, the local tourism association successfully petitioned the Miyazaki Prefecture to re-install the "Hakkō ichiu" characters.[3] The tower has been a point of some controversy, as many Japanese citizens wonder how a structure created specifically to convey Japanese might during a period of conquest can now be a symbol for peace.[3] Some people consider the lack of documentation regarding the militaristic genesis of the tower to subtract from the structure's re-imagined power as a symbol for peace.[3] Other survivors of the period have stated that the tower allows the horrors of war to be passed down through generations.[3]

Image dimensions: 2931 x 1954 pixels

Heiwadai Park P...

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Heiwadai Park Peace Tower

Heiwadai Park 平和台公園 Peace Park A 36-metre (118 ft) tower was constructed in 1940 to memorialize the installment of Japan's first emperor, Jimmu.[3] The original name was Hakkō ichiu Tower, meaning "Eight World Regions Under One Roof," a slogan of the Imperial Japanese Army.[2] Designed by Jitsuzo Hinago, the tower was created from stones gathered from around the then-current extent of the Japanese empire at a cost of 670,000 yen.[3][1] The writing "Hakkō ichiu" was removed after the Japanese defeat at the insistence of the U.S. military.[3] The tower was the inception point for the torch relay of the 1964 Summer Olympics.[3] Subsequent to the Olympics, which coincided with worldwide interest in the Japanese Imperial family, the local tourism association successfully petitioned the Miyazaki Prefecture to re-install the "Hakkō ichiu" characters.[3] The tower has been a point of some controversy, as many Japanese citizens wonder how a structure created specifically to convey Japanese might during a period of conquest can now be a symbol for peace.[3] Some people consider the lack of documentation regarding the militaristic genesis of the tower to subtract from the structure's re-imagined power as a symbol for peace.[3] Other survivors of the period have stated that the tower allows the horrors of war to be passed down through generations.[3]

Image dimensions: 2931 x 1954 pixels